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Exclusive: Pop Culture Principle interviews Kristin Lehman

Headshot2With a résumé that would be the envy of any of her peers, Kristin Lehman is definitely one of the hardest working actors in the business today. She has had roles in hit series such as The Killing, Judging Amy, Felicity, Poltergeist: The Legacy, Killer Instinct, and Drive. She has made guest appearances on hit shows like Castle, The X-Files, Prison Break, The Firm, and Andromeda. And now, starting May 23 at 9PM EST, American audiences will be able to watch the Canadian-born actress on the new ABC series Motive. The show has already had a successful first season in Canada and has been renewed for a second year. Kristin was kind enough to take time out of her busy schedule to talk about Motive, her career, the business, and two passion projects of hers: Truth Heart and This Fair Land. PCP – What sets Motive apart from other procedurals on television today? KL – A lot of the questions we get about are about the hook of the show. The “why” aspect as opposed to the “who-did-it” aspect. When you make television, you hope you are doing something that is entertaining as opposed to reinventing the wheel. What matters to me is whether or not the characters are compelling, and that the audience wants to know more. People tuned into Columbo because they were invested in that character. I feel like our “A” stories are really interesting and surprising, and I hope that people want to get invested in our characters as well. PCP – What drew you to the character of Detective Angie Flynn? KL – Well, I have to tell you it was a little different. The source material was a bit different from what we have now. Angie is kind of a lovely, happy hybrid of a script that was a little darker, much more character driven and was less network-friendly—not that anything is wrong with network-friendly. The character Angie turned everything on its ear.  It wasn’t a woman who was pretending to maintain a standard of beauty that was common. She was described as this no-nonsense woman who was from the working class. A single mom who wasn’t afraid of her sexuality, and she wasn’t apologetic about her age and who she is. She was also very funny, and good at her job. It’s a female driven script, and I felt lucky to be able to play this character. PCP – You’ve played a cop before in the past; did you do any preparation for this role? KL – Yeah, Louie and Francis and I were lucky to meet with the Vancouver P.D..  We met with a male and female detective team, and they were fantastic. We did our tactical training where you got to know your gun safety, but the stuff that was more interesting to me was to see the workplace of this detective team. How often does that happen? We saw firsthand the junk food they ate, the way they communicated, what they wore. I tell you, I have been totally poisoned by every cop show out there, because these detectives were warm and friendly: family oriented, dressed really well, and took pride in being detectives. They had a really strong sense of honor, and they were warm and open. I am forever grateful, because it gave me so much freedom to play a cop just as a person. You know what I mean? They obviously see horrible things and they have coping mechanisms, but those coping mechanisms are a result of seeing those horrible things. It’s not like they are trained in them or anything like that.58117_377115965735014_1847595532_n PCP – What was it like working with Louis Ferrega? Was the chemistry immediate? KL – Oh, yes, it was immediate. Some of it is because we’ve both been around the block together. We aren’t spring chickens! We hadn’t worked together before. We sat down and talked about why we were doing the show, why we were proud to be in Canada doing the show. At our very first audition together, I didn’t get all the sides I was supposed to audition with, but luckily our producer just put me in a room with Louie, and very quickly I was able to textualize what I was supposed to have had for a long time—the sides.  We connected in a way that actors are honest and we just spoke to each other. Right from the very beginning, we really worked well together, plus we are also good buddies on the set. I think that it really does shine through in our work. PCP – The banter between your two characters is fantastic. KL – I’m so glad. That is what we want. That’s the time when we are really pleased to not to have to push a storyline along. When we get to actually show humans conversing or communicating is when it is really fun, and he’s always game for that. PCP – Do you consider Louis’ character as somewhat of a father figure to your son on the show? KL –I don’t think so. I think they are friends, first and foremost. He respects both of those people as people, and, if they connect, then they connect. Otherwise I don’t think she thinks Manny needs a father figure. She observes people around her, and is willing to accept people for who they are and what they are, and if that happens to be an element of the relationship that both of them seem to gravitate towards, she wouldn’t stand in the way. But, honestly, I don’t think that is something she’s trying to create. motive-cast-web11PCP – One of the unfortunate things that comes up when you have a male/female partnership on a show is the “will they or won’t they” question. Any thoughts on that pertaining to your show? KL – We will not! Ever! Here’s why: a) it’s boring to play as an actor, and b) I feel like most of these people know they suck at relationships. They just wouldn’t jeopardize what they have with each other. It is a much deeper intimacy, and there’s a trust that they don’t have to question or be afraid of, which I think they both have in the romantic aspects of their lives. So they just keep it apart. PCP – There are times when you feel sympathy towards the killers in the episodes. Would you agree? KL – For sure. I think that it’s necessary, because human beings are fragile and sometimes really messed up, but they are really just fragile. Bad decisions get made all the time—some more serious than others. They are not always pre-meditated, and there is a real sadness to that. I think that’s the one thing that Angie feels. You made a bad decision, so let’s talk about your bad decision. PCP – Another fantastic show you worked on was AMC’s The Killing. How did you get involved with that show? KL – That was a great show. I was really lucky, they just called me up. I had taken three years off to have my little boy, and was deciding what I was going to do when I got back into acting. Soon this amazing, beautiful script fell into my lap, and I moved back to Vancouver to do it. I was really lucky, and feel forever grateful for being on that show.MV5BMTM4ODM0NTM0N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTY1Nzg5NA@@._V1._SX640_SY962_ PCP – The world of politics is an interesting one. Any special preparations for this role? KL – I didn’t do any real preparation for that role. I did read some campaign books, and I formed good relations with my fellow actors, Billy Campbell and Eric Laten. We became great friends, and even carpooled to work! The reason why I didn’t do a lot of preparation for the role is because we weren’t ever really showcased doing our jobs. We were an interpersonal story. It would have been different if I was an astronaut or a surgeon, needing to know technical skills or being shown doing my job. This show was more about hiding emotional pain under the guise of a job description. The show really was a gift, and I am really grateful. PCP – It seemed as if AMC was promoting the idea that we would find out who the killer was at the end of the season. Was that indeed the case? KL – No, they didn’t promote it that way. Everyone just assumed that. They basically said just keep watching. I think people are so use to finding out who the killer is after thirteen episodes. If you go back and you watch that first season again, I don’t know how anyone would think they would find out who the killer was. There was no resolution near the end of the episodes. I’d rather work on a show that just dares to do what it wants to do regardless of what the network says you should do. So if people don’t like it then that’s okay, but I’d rather work on a show that would try to do something new and different. PCP – You worked on another series called Drive with Nathan Fillion, and also guest starred on an episode of his show Castle. What was it like working with Nathan? KL –He’s such a dear friend of mine. He basically asked me, “Do you want to do this?” and I said, “Er... yeah!” Again, I was really lucky. Nathan was the best co-star ever. When we did Drive I was in a car with him every episode. It was mostly green screen, so I basically sat in a car with Nathan, and we had a great time. He’s just the funniest, most wonderful co-star. He’s such a great leader. In fact, when I got Motive I called him immediately, and asked him to share with me some things that are important when you are the number one on the show, what makes for a positive working environment for everyone. I really value the way he approaches work, and the respect he has for colleagues, the crew, and everyone. People should be so lucky to get to work with him.125416_294_pre PCP – You’ve worked on both American and Canadian television series. What are the differences between the two? KL – Well, I’ve lived in L.A. for twelve years so the majority of my network experience is different. In the States there are three major networks and cable companies. In Canada there are a couple of networks that have now become neck-and-neck in their importance but for a long time there were only one or two networks. We only have a tenth of the population of the States, so a lot of our work—television and movies—is partially funded by the government.  It’s really a whole different structure. Since you have fewer people in your population, advertising dollars are high and the stakes are high, but it’s not our number one export. For the States, I think movies and television are in the top ten as far as exports go. So, for me, I felt a great deal more freedom to create a character that wasn’t as dependent on what the advertisers needed, and the network wasn’t breathing down my neck to deliver a certain amount of numbers because they promised an advertiser who needs to make their quota. It’s not to say that dollars and cents don’t matter; I’m not saying that at all. It’s just that you are dealing with an entirely different infrastructure. PCP – Do you have any advice for someone thinking about entering the business? KL –I think if you can make your living as a journeyman actor, then you have success. If you are hoping to get notoriety or fame, then that is something different, and that is not the same as being an actor. To that person I don’t have any advice, because I don’t know. To the person who loves acting, appreciates and respects the work and hopes to make a living at it, I would say take care of yourself, eat properly, get enough sleep, and learn how to audition, because ninety percent of what you are going to do is auditioning. It’s not spending time on set. It’s going in the room and making sure you can deliver. I would say take as many classes as you can. Read a lot of plays, be realistic, and develop a thick skin. I would constantly assess: “Is this the career for me?” It’s one thing to be doing something when you are in your twenties, thirties, and forties. Once you get into your fifties and sixties, you will understand that you have a skill set that is limited, and, if it’s what you are relying on for the rest of your life, you have to know how to make it your business as opposed to hoping that someone likes you. PCP – Did you want to talk a little bit about Heart Truth?kl139 KL – Heart Truth is basically the Canadian facsimile of the Red Dress campaign that is done in the States.  It’s a campaign for women’s heart health awareness and there is this version in Canada. I have the pleasure of being involved with it. I saw a Ted Talk about three years ago by cardiologist Dr. Noel Bairey- Mertz, who runs the Barbara Streisand Women’s Heart Center at Cedars Sinai. She was giving statistics on dramatic differences in women’s health versus men’s health. She was showing that there really needs to be a different kind of awareness for women’s heart health research. So the Red Dress Campaign and Heart Truth are about raising funds to broaden the spectrum of research towards women’s heart health. I learned things about my own health, and jumped at the chance to learn more and to be part of this campaign as it grows. PCP – Finally, did you want to talk about your online magazine “This Fair Land?” KL – “This Fair Land” is my online magazine. Thank you for asking, because I love it! My husband is a filmmaker, and obviously we make our life in Canada by choice after travelling the world, and being inspired by everything that is out there.  We wanted to present a place where we could explore creative living in Canada, and have that online magazine take a place in the international world where people could go there. Canadians and international people alike could come to the site to find a place to become inspired by what Canada can offer in terms of its culture and creativity. So we do that through film, journalism, and photography. It’s lifestyle, art and music-oriented, and we are growing. We had our inaugural launch at the end of April. We have six films lined up that explore what it is to live an artful life, breaking down what creativity is to its simplest building blocks, and encouraging everybody to look in their own lives in that way. Again, we would like to thank Kristin for chatting with us and make sure you tune in to the series Motive on Thursday nights on ABC!  Take a moment and check out some of the links below. LINKS Follow Kristen on Twitter here The Hearth Truth website click here This Fair Land online magazine click here
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EXCLUSIVE - Rena Sofer talks to the Pop Culture Principle

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Rena Sofer is one of the hardest working actresses in the industry today. With appearances in shows like Seinfeld, 24, Heroes, Melrose Place, Blind Justice, Just Shoot Me and NCIS to name a few, she has a resume that would be the envy of any working actor in the business. She has just recently returned from filming and episode of the ABC hit series Once Upon A Time. She sits down with the Pop Culture Principle to talk about that appearance, her career and Bon Vivant Candles..a brand new business she is involved with and extremely passionate about. PCP - You just recently filmed an episode of Once Upon A Time. How did you get involved with the project and how was it working on the show? RS – Well, I was called in to audition for the part, but at the time I had the flu and couldn't make the audition. I was so upset because people always told me I looked like Snow White when I was growing up. So, I really wanted to play Snow White’s mother and I thought it would be such a great opportunity. They came back to me later when I was feeling better and I went into audition for the part. They didn't tell me I had the job until after Christmas and New Year’s.  I had auditioned in the middle of December and didn't find out that I had the job until the first week of January and then I got to go do it and it was amazing. The costumes on the show were amazing. Not only where they comfortable for me, but so much of the character is about the costume and how that costume makes you feel. Being in that costume, it really took me to that place and it was amazing. Bailey Madison who played young Snow White… her costumes were just mind-boggling. How beautiful they were. These people should win Emmys every year for their costumes, they are unbelievable.

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 PCP - So, let’s go back a bit…when you were 15, you were approached by someone from Elite Modeling agency to become a model and that lead to you getting into acting? RS – Well, I tried to be a model when I was younger. I tried the petite modeling because I am only 5’5, 5’6. Um, but it just never really worked for me. It just wasn’t my style. So, when that didn’t work for me, the woman who approached me to get into that business said you know what, let’s just start doing acting instead and we went from there and that’s where I have been successful. PCP – I am always curious, do you remember your first official paying acting job? RS – Yes, I do. My first official paying acting gig was like a music video for MTV. Well, not really a video but kind of a PSA for MTV and we were lip synching to a song. You know the Michael Jackson song black and white where all the faces morph into each other? It was kind of like that and I also did a test trailer for a movie called The Boy Who Could Fly. So, those were my first paying gigs. PCP - Many actors get their start in the soap opera world. You worked on Loving and General Hospital. How was it working on a soap opera and what did you take away from the experience on those shows? RS – Well, the very first soap I ever worked on was Another World and I did 6 episodes of that show. It was a lot of fun. It was all the way in Brooklyn and I lived in New York and it was kind of an interesting experience. Loving was literally like college to me. I mean the people I worked with we became extremely close to each other.  We are still friends to this day and I mean we would work together and then go out at night together. It was one of the greatest experiences of my life. Then, I left to come to California and never thinking I was going to do soap but not closing my eyes to it though. Soaps can be a bit heart breaking. You can get a job there, but if the character doesn’t work or the story doesn’t work, they don’t just let you go. They keep you there and you don’t have anything to do and you can’t do anything else. So, it’s a question of whether you want to give up that time and for my first job on Loving, it was a great experience.  So, it was questionable the second time I got into it, but when I read the character of Lois on General Hospital I just couldn’t pass her up. To this day, one of the best characters I’ve ever played. Probably my top 3 characters I have ever played on television and I won an Emmy for it. It was a really great experience and I got a lot out of that show.

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PCP – What was it like to win the Emmy for the role of Lois?

RS – It was awesome. I was really shocked. My character was the comedic relief of the show and even though I had some emotional moments, when you are sitting at the Emmys and everyone is up for their awards and everyone is crying hysterically on their clips and here is me jumping out of a cake with sparklers.  So, it was really funny and I just didn’t expect it and it was amazing. I still have it out and I was so appreciative and humbled by it. PCP - You have such an amazing body of work and I could talk about a lot of the stuff you’ve worked on, but I’ll just pick a few. I remember the first time I saw you. It was on the muffin tops episode of Seinfeld? What was it like working with Jerry and the cast? RS – Oh my God! Seinfeld was brilliant. One of the easiest and best jobs I’ve had. They were friends and such a well-oiled machine by that time, you just come in, do your job and leave. Everyone still sees it to this day. I was on an episode of Seinfeld, Friends and a possible love interest on the show Ellen. I’ve been on some amazing, iconic television shows. I am so proud that I got those jobs. PCP – One of my guilty pleasures from the 90s was the show Melrose Place. It had to be a lot of fun working on that show. I felt so bad for your character on that show. RS – So unfair going to prison for something Amanda did and then she gets my guy too? So not fair! LOL! It was so great working on that show. First of all, I was a huge fan. I loved Melrose Place and I watched it every single week. I don’t really like those types of shows so it’s a big deal for me to say that. I got to play the crazy cheerleader. Are you kidding me? It was awesome. I even got to sing on the show and I can’t sing so I lip synced everything of course, but it was great and a lot of fun!

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PCP - With shows like Melrose Place, Seinfeld, 24 and NCIS who have casts and crew that have been together for a while, do you find it easy to come on as a guest star and fit right in to the rhythm of the show? RS – Well, it depends on the cast. I’ve joined casts where they really didn’t want me there and don’t really want to spice up their show, not that I am really going to spice up the show. You are an actress who auditioned, got a part and now you can pay your mortgage.  Some casts didn’t particularly like me coming on, but three of the casts you mentioned Melrose Place, NCIS and 24 where amazing to work on.  Melrose Place was great because they were used to people come in and out. NCIS…never worked with a kinder, more decent group of people…from the top to the bottom.  NCIS there was no top or bottom. Mark Harmon treats everyone the same on that show… from an extra to an executive producer.  It’s unbelievable and I had never been treated like that in my life. On 24, if you don’t gel with Kiefer Sutherland or the show you can come on and play some magic role and within one scene, they’ve now rewritten you and you’ve been shot.  It’s such a testament to be invited back episode after episode. I was there for 14 episodes…until the end of that season... until they really didn’t have anything else for me to do. Kiefer was one of those teachers you had in grade school or high school that was the toughest teacher ever and everyone was terrified of that teacher, but for some reason you get that teacher and you just want that teacher to be proud of you, so you work your butt off. When that teacher at the end of the year gives you your last final exam and you get an A and it says good job, it’s as if you just won the Academy award, so that’s the way I felt about 24. PCP – 24 was a very stressful show to watch, was it that stressful shooting the show? RS – Shooting that show was exactly like watching that show. When you were doing a scene when there was gun fire, if you messed up, you had no idea of the domino you have stopped. You have to be on your ball. You have to watch out for those flying bullet parts. It is so exact. It is as quick and as intense as when you are watching it. You would come home so exhausted from the adrenaline rush. It was amazing, really amazing.

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PCP – I’ve heard many good things about working with Mark Harmon. You had some great scenes on NCIS with him. What was it like working with Mark? RS – I loved working with Mark. I was so sad that they never asked me back. I wanted to come back and start some more trouble on that show. LOL PCP - Acting is a tough business. You continue to have great success. If there is an aspiring actor/actress reading this interview, what advice would you give to him or her? RS – It’s a really tough business and I have to say the business has really changed in the last 10 years. Because movies aren’t what they use to be and movie actresses have moved into television, so it is much more difficult to get a job. For me, I never chose to be a movie actress because I have children and I didn’t want to be on the road. I didn’t want that kind of life for myself or my children. Family is really important in my life. The thing I’ve noticed now is that so many people want to be an actor because they want to be famous. If you want to be an actor just to be famous, the chances of that happening are slim to none. If you can do nothing else in your life but act, I say God bless you, go with God. I never really want to advise people to go into this business because for me, if there was anything else that I ever wanted to do, I would have done that instead because the heartbreak of the constant rejection and the constant feeling less than and the constant being compared to this person or that person. How big or how tall or how thin or how fat you are. It’s really difficult. You have to have a strong constitution and you have to believe in who you are and what you are doing for it to be a successful venture for you. No matter what that is, but you have to be ready, like a fighter to be knocked out over and over and over again and be ok with that. That’s my advice. I’ve been doing this for 25 years, I’ve had an amazing career, and I’ve been so grateful and thankful for my career. It has slowed down a bit in the last 8 years because I had my youngest daughter and my husband and I decided we don’t want a nanny raising our kid. I really made a very conscious choice to say in Los Angeles. Since there is so little work in Los Angeles now, I have closed myself off to a lot of opportunities as far as my career is concerned starring in series. So, I started a new business with a friend of mine because I’m trying to parlay other passions I have into other areas of my life.  I still love to act; I still love to put myself out there. I just haven’t made it my be all end all anymore. So, the advice is be a fighter, be prepared to be knocked down, but also if you have other interests. Say you want to be an actor but like to write, write your own stuff. Look at Lena Dunham, she writes, directs and produces her own series. I mean this is a kid who probably got the door slammed in her face a million times and look what she has been able to do. So, have other interests, don’t make it your  be all end all and believe in yourself.

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PCP - When you aren’t working, what do you like to do in your spare time? Hobbies? RS – Well, I’m a mom with no nanny or babysitter, so that is a full-time job. When I’m not working, I’m a mom. When I am working I have other mom friends help me out. That’s a full-time job. PCP - While doing my research, came across a product that you are involved with called Bon Vivant candles Want to talk a bit about the product? RS – Yes, the website is www.bonvivantcandle.com. This product is responsible for the way my skin looks and helps me age very slowly and gracefully, thank you Dino Morra. I’ve been using his products for years and recently have decided to go into business with him and partner with him as well. I’ve been his guinea pig for the past 14 years and his work shows really well. Our first product that we put out there is this amazing collagen body candle. There is no wax or paraffin in our candle. It’s pure vegetable emulsification, vitamin E and C. One of our main ingredients is a black licorice extract which is a skin lightner and also has tons of collagen. You light the candle and it begins to melt instantly. You use the liquid and you rub it in to your skin. The smells are amazing. We have 3 scents, blood orange, vanilla cocoa and the peony. They make your body smell great and they make your skin feel amazing. It’s a product that no one out there has, very unique and all natural. It isn’t tested on animals either. That’s my other baby right now.

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PCP – You just recently joined Twitter. Are you starting to warm up to the social media aspect? RS – I know, I’m at @Renasofer.  I have mixed feelings about the whole social media aspect of life. I guess my issue is I’m not really interested in people knowing what I had for breakfast or showing pictures of my kids. It’s a great way for people to know what you are doing and what you have going on with our work, so it’s a really great opportunity, but I find it a bit difficult to navigate how much you give of yourself and how much you keep to yourself. I’m a very private person, there’s not a lot out there about me, I don’t have a Facebook page, so I am giving it a go. I know Bailey Madison who played young Snow White on Once Upon a Time; she’s got that twitter hash tag stuff down. I’m not really that great, but it’s a learning curve. We’ll see what happens. PCP – Any upcoming projects you can talk about? RS – Just gearing up for pilot season and doing some auditions. Once Upon a Time should be airing March 3rd I think, so that’s about it. The Pop Culture Principle would like to thank Rena Sofer for taking the time out of her busy schedule to talk with us. Please make sure you take a moment and look at the links below. LINKS Rena Sofer on Twitter click here Bon Vivant Candles click here
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Pop Culture Principle talks with Seamus Dever

Castle, the popular television series for ABC, is now entering its fifth season on the network. One of the reasons the show has become so successful has been the work of actor Seamus Dever who plays Detective Kevin Ryan on the series. Recently Seamus was kind enough to sit down with us to discuss the show, acting, his career and what he likes to do when he isn't on the set. We also discussed some great organizations that help protect animals, something that is very important to Seamus and his wife. Seamus also has an extensive resume of acting credits. From working on the soap opera General Hospital, to guest starring roles in series such as The Ghost Whisperer, Cold Case, Army Wives, NCIS, Drop Dead Diva and all 3 CSI television shows to name a few.

PCP – What was it that made you want to become an actor? SD – I’ve been acting for about 30 years now. I started doing it when I was a kid. Did a lot of plays growing up. It’s one of those things you introduce kids to and find out you have an aptitude for it.  I was playing the lead role in Oliver when I was 12 and I felt what a sensation it was to be on stage and people liking what you were doing. PCP – Do you remember your very first paying acting job? SD – Yes I do. My first paying acting job was in a production of Camelot. It was a production from Texas that came through and they did a month of performances. Yea, that was my first gig and at that moment I was a professional actor at age 11. PCP – Many actors have had their start on soap operas. You worked on General Hospital. What was it like working on that soap? SD – It was great. I had done a lot of guest starring roles by the time I did General Hospital. It was my first experience being in front of a camera every day. You are surrounded by cameras and are allowed to do basically what you want to do. If you have an impulse to do something, you don’t have to sit down and have a big long discussion about it. You know whatever you are doing is sort of you creating something instantly and you are making it as you go knowing it will air in three weeks which was great. It really makes you think about your choices and come in with ideas and get really creative. It taught me a lot about being in front of a camera and making mistakes as you go. PCP – The role of Detective Kevin Ryan on Castle. How did that role come to you? SD – I was doing an arc on a show called Army Wives. I was playing a motorcycle doctor named Getty. I ended up dying on the show and when I was done with that show, I came back to LA because we filmed Army Wives in South Carolina. I then did a guest spot on Ghost Whisperer and one of the casting directors also worked on Castle. I sort of ended up on their radar after working on Ghost Whisperer.  The role of Kevin Ryan came around. They had already shot the pilot, I came in for an audition for that, they liked me. They called me back for a producer’s session, but I was on vacation in Italy at the time, but they saved it until the next session which was in front of all the executives and  executive producers and they really liked me. Army Bernstein, the executive producer of Castle, was a big advocate for me. He really pushed for me to get the role and I owe Army Bernstein a lot for that. PCP – What is it like working with Jon Huertas? Did you guys have instant chemistry when you first started working together? SD – I think there where elements at the very beginning that we fostered and grew as we went along. We didn't know each other before that and I think a lot of people think we’ve been friends for years, but  I had never met him before. I actually met him the day before we started shooting. It just so happened we have a lot in common and at the same time we are both different which works well. He’s got his strengths, I’ve got my strengths and we are both very open to working together and discussing our work. We said if we are going to make an impact on this show, we need to stick together to do it. We let down our guards and we rehearse. Jon will come to my trailer or I will go to his and we read through a scene and come up with ideas and we make choices together. We don’t really have egos when it comes to building the Ryan/Espisito relationship. The idea is making our relationship as appealing as possible so people will say that is a side of Castle that we would like to see. So, when we are not there, because there are episodes when we are not there,  people miss it and don’t consider it a Castle episode when we are not there.

PCP – Have you enjoyed the progression of your character from Season 1 going into Season 5. SD – Yes, it’s something that I’ve been trying to grow. Always pushing for more.  Always advocating for my character to do more. Started out as a supporting role and still a lot of times I am still a supporting role, so I’d like to see more, but its been nice seeing the character grow. PCP – Nathan Fillion is known as a prankster on set, what is it like working on the show with Nathan? SD – I suppose so. 🙂 He has a funny prank that he does where he has an electric shocker pen that he started using around the second season. I think he forgot that he’s done it from time to time and that we are use to it. You hold it and press the end of it to write and it shocks you. It’s not like a pen that you ever seen before and it quite clearly has a battery in it. LOL. We actually do a significant amount of work and we do work very hard on Castle. We work really fast and really hard.  We have a good time when we work and sometimes it seems like we are just messing around all day long, but we grind them out. We have a lot of hours in that precinct where we are trying to do something interesting. PCP – In the series, your character proposed to and married his girlfriend on the show who is actually your wife in real life.  How is it working with her on the show? SD – It’s really cool. It’s fun to have her on the show. She’s invested, how could she not be, I spend all my days there. It’s nice when she comes on set. She visits me at work and everyone likes her. They write her some fun stuff to do on the show. Hopefully there will be some more for her character. It’s great working with her on the show. PCP – Do you have a favorite episode of Castle? SD –Double Down use to be my favorite for a long time. We had a lot of fun doing it. There’s was an episode called Kick the Ballistics where we got to explore Ryan a lot more. That’s sort of my favorite as far as me stretching my legs as an actor. It reminds people I’ve done more than just bringing a piece of information. I got to stretch and I wasn’t just the supporting guy. There’s an episode we did called Swan Song, I think its episode 4 in the new season. I think the audience will really like it. We laughed a lot while we did it and from all accounts from our editors, there is a lot of funny stuff going on in the episode. A camera crew follows us around in the precinct. There’s a lot of talking to the camera, explaining what we do and a lot of playing up to the cameras for some of the characters. I think it’s one of my new favorites. PCP – How are you different from your character on the show and how are you the same? SD – A lot of times people want to make their characters superheroes. They know 5 languages, they know all these sports and an impossible amount of information. As an actor you collect various amounts of experiences that you choose that your character knows or not. I have to remind myself that Seamus Dever  is really good at facts and speaks a couple different languages while Kevin Ryan does not. Kevin Ryan is good at being a cop and Seamus Dever has never trained to be a cop. You have to give your character somewhere to grow and not be afraid to let your character have flaws. Just because I feel like showing off, doesn’t mean that I should. My character is still a cop, he hasn't been all around the world like I have personally, so he’s learning as he goes. I think there are some things that Ryan will surprise people with.

PCP – Any hints for the new season of Castle? SD – There are going to be a lot of interesting things for Ryan. There may be some family starting. I think this season Ryan is trying to figure out what he’s going to do. A lot of cops get into this thing where they want to raise a family. Does Ryan want to stay a cop? Is Ryan going to take an officer’s exam? There are going to be some interesting things between Ryan and Espisito this season that might surprise some people. We are working on a few things. Jon and I made a pact to get in shape so maybe we can show some skin on the show. We’d love to show the physical sides of Ryan and Espisito.  The rift between us is sort of in status right now. It’s going to take some time for Ryan and Espisito to trust each other and be in the same room at the beginning of the season. Should be interesting to see how it all progresses. PCP – Both you and your wife are involved with Best Friends Animal Society and Farm Sanctuary. Do you wan to talk a little bit about those organizations? SD – They are great organizations. Best Friends is based in Utah and I’ve supported them for 7 or 8 years now. They had a show called Dog Town on Nat Geo and they have a great advertising campaign and that’s how I became aware of them. Farm Sanctuary is the same thing where we donate money and I also lend myself to their cause. I am doing a Best Friends event called Strut Your Mutt shortly. I’ll be doing their ribbon cutting ceremony. Farm Sanctuary has 3 farms where they rescue animals. You get a different perspective when you see animals that aren’t couped up in cages. You get to see how affectionate they are around people. It puts a face on the cause and I think if people went to them and had that experience, they would think about the food they consume in a different way. I’m not saying they will become vegetarians as I am, but they might have a little bit more perspective about humane practices with animals. I encourage everyone to go visit a farm. My credo the last 8 years or so is if there is a way for us to survive without having other things suffer, it would be the best thing for all of us. PCP – When you aren’t acting, what do you do to relax? Any hobbies? SD – I work out a lot. Been doing the P90X program. I try to get a workout in first thing. It’s pretty silly because you are in your garage jumping around by yourself. LOL  I get up at 4 in the morning lifting weights and working out before the sun is even up. I do a lot of carpentry...lots of carpentry projects going on. Now that I have a house, there is a lot of gardening to do as well. Lots of home repairs and fixing things. A big thank you to Seamus Dever for taking the time out to do this interview with us. We hoped you enjoyed it. Take a moment and visit some of the links below. LINKS Seamus Dever Official Website Seamus Dever Official Facebook Page The Ryan Report - Detective Ryan's Blog Best Friends Animal Society Farm Sanctuary
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